Escaping the Labyrinth: Suffering in YA Fiction and the Case of John Green’s [Looking for Alaska]

  How will we ever get out of this labyrinth of suffering? --A.Y. - John Green, Looking for Alaska (p. 158) What is the role of suffering in young adult literature? I've been obsessed with answering this question since one of my dissertation committee members asked me it a couple of weeks ago. My desire to answer this … Continue reading Escaping the Labyrinth: Suffering in YA Fiction and the Case of John Green’s [Looking for Alaska]

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Queer Time in Edmund White’s [A Boy’s Own Story]

Edmund White's A Boy's Own Story is a coming-of-age novel centered on the sexual awakening of a queer teenage boy in the Midwest during the 1950s. The novel discusses topics such as the corruption of innocence, the pressures of masculinity in the lives of young boys, the emergence of childhood sexuality, and the exploration of humanity through … Continue reading Queer Time in Edmund White’s [A Boy’s Own Story]

An Analysis of Pastiche in Art Spiegelman’s [Maus I: My Father Bleeds History]

Art Spiegelman's Maus revolutionized the perception of comics not only in academia, but also in popular culture. Not only is it the first graphic novel to ever win a Pulitzer prize, but its presence has been ubiquitous in academia--appealing to scholars interested in areas such as the image-text relationship, animal studies, postmodernism, history, memoir, Holocaust studies, and … Continue reading An Analysis of Pastiche in Art Spiegelman’s [Maus I: My Father Bleeds History]

Foucault and the History of Sexuality: A “Queer” Overview

If sex is repressed, that is, condemned to prohibition, nonexistence, and silence, then the mere fact that one is speaking about it has the appearance of a deliberate transgression. A person who holds forth in such language places himself to a certain extent outside the reach of power; he upsets established law; he somehow anticipates … Continue reading Foucault and the History of Sexuality: A “Queer” Overview

An Overview of Judith Halberstam’s [The Queer Art of Failure]

I usually steer away from aesthetic judgments when writing about theory books, but in this case, let me start by saying that Judith Halberstam's The Queer Art of Failure was an absolute joy to read. What else can one expect from a theory book that opens up with a quote from the Nickelodeon cartoon series, SpongeBob … Continue reading An Overview of Judith Halberstam’s [The Queer Art of Failure]

A Queer Overview of Judith Butler’s [Gender Trouble]

Rich, complex, difficult, and groundbreaking are just a few of the words that are usually associated with Judith Butler's works. Despite the fact that her texts are often described as "tedious" and "overwrought," reading Butler is well worth the effort, and I'm often amazed at the way she is able to wrestle with difficult ideas. … Continue reading A Queer Overview of Judith Butler’s [Gender Trouble]

J.D. Salinger’s [The Catcher in the Rye]: A Brief Analysis

Experience is the greatest enemy of meaning and significance. When I first read J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye during my late teens, I was absolutely captivated by the novel's passive anti-hero, Holden Caulfield. I felt his loneliness, his distaste towards all of the "phoniness" present in the world, and his constant state of utter helplessness … Continue reading J.D. Salinger’s [The Catcher in the Rye]: A Brief Analysis