Course Syllabus: Queer Young Adult Literature

Hello readers! So, I'm finally teaching one of my dream courses, and it's one that I've been anxious to teach for quite some time! Click here to access the syllabus that I've designed for an intermediate seminar that I’m currently teaching at Bowdoin College. The seminar is entitled Queer Young Adult Literature, and it is currently offered under Bowdoin’s … Continue reading Course Syllabus: Queer Young Adult Literature

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Developing a Course on Metafictional Young Adult Literature

During the past couple of weeks, I've been working on developing various literature courses, including a course on the metafictional turn in contemporary young adult literature. As of now, I have entitled the course Book-Ception: The Metafictional Turn in Young Adult Literature. For those of you who are confused about the title, -Ception is a … Continue reading Developing a Course on Metafictional Young Adult Literature

Unrealistic Expectations: (Meta)Narrative in Andrew Smith’s [Winger]

Warning: The following post contains major spoilers for Andrew Smith's Winger.  After reading Andrew Smith's Grasshopper Jungle, I immediately knew that I had to read other works written by this author--and Winger seemed like the obvious choice. I finished reading Winger a couple of weeks ago. Typically, I write analyses and reviews of books soon after I read them, but for this novel, … Continue reading Unrealistic Expectations: (Meta)Narrative in Andrew Smith’s [Winger]

John Barth’s “Lost in the Funhouse”: A Postmodern Critique of the Developmental Narrative

"Lost in the Funhouse" is a short story in John Barth's book of the same name, originally published in 1968.  The stories within this collection are typically approached as postmodern due to their self-reflexivity, their self-awareness, and their use of self-reference. The short story "Life in the Funhouse," in particular, is known for its active … Continue reading John Barth’s “Lost in the Funhouse”: A Postmodern Critique of the Developmental Narrative

Structure and Development in Mark Haddon’s [The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time]

The publication history of Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the God in the Night-Time (2003) is indeed very curious, mostly because it was deliberately marketed as both a children's book and an adult novel. This leads me to invoke a pressing issue among scholars and readers who are concerned with narratives of youth: is it possible, nowadays, … Continue reading Structure and Development in Mark Haddon’s [The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time]