Call for Papers: Research on Diversity in Youth Literature 2.1 – Special Issue on Queer Futurities in Youth Literature

  Call for Papers: Research on Diversity in Youth Literature 2.1 - Special Issue on Queer Futurities in Youth Literature RDYL 2.1 will be guest edited by Dr. Angel Daniel Matos (San Diego State University) and Dr. Jon Michael Wargo (Boston College). RYDL is a peer-reviewed, online, open-access journal hosted by St. Catherine University’s Master … Continue reading Call for Papers: Research on Diversity in Youth Literature 2.1 – Special Issue on Queer Futurities in Youth Literature

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An Overview of Judith Halberstam’s [The Queer Art of Failure]

I usually steer away from aesthetic judgments when writing about theory books, but in this case, let me start by saying that Judith Halberstam's The Queer Art of Failure was an absolute joy to read. What else can one expect from a theory book that opens up with a quote from the Nickelodeon cartoon series, SpongeBob … Continue reading An Overview of Judith Halberstam’s [The Queer Art of Failure]

Feeling Backward: Loss and the Politics of Queer History

We supposedly live in a time where it is "okay to be gay." This growing sentiment can partially be accredited to the nationalization of gay media and representations in our society. When I was a child, finding gay representations in television and movies was a challenge--it was only in my teen years that gayness became … Continue reading Feeling Backward: Loss and the Politics of Queer History

Heternormative Tragedies? The Queerness of Eugene O’Neill’s “Bound East for Cardiff” and Henrik Ibsen’s “Rosmersholm”

Both Eugene O’Neill’s Bound East for Cardiff (1914)[1] and Henrik Ibsen’s Rosemersholm (1886) can be considered tragic, not only because they display characters that are unable to fit within the context of their social norms, but also because both plays portray the mortal downfall of its main characters. Nonetheless, the complexities of these “failures” increase … Continue reading Heternormative Tragedies? The Queerness of Eugene O’Neill’s “Bound East for Cardiff” and Henrik Ibsen’s “Rosmersholm”