Foucault and the History of Sexuality: A “Queer” Overview

If sex is repressed, that is, condemned to prohibition, nonexistence, and silence, then the mere fact that one is speaking about it has the appearance of a deliberate transgression. A person who holds forth in such language places himself to a certain extent outside the reach of power; he upsets established law; he somehow anticipates … Continue reading Foucault and the History of Sexuality: A “Queer” Overview

An Overview of Kathryn Bond Stockton’s [The Queer Child]

Why is there such a hesitancy to label a child as queer? Is it possible that all children are queer (at least in some sense of the word)? How does a child grow, when said growth is being heavily monitored, delayed, and controlled? These are just some of the many questions that Stockton explores in … Continue reading An Overview of Kathryn Bond Stockton’s [The Queer Child]

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s [Epistemology of the Closet] – A Staple of Queer Theory

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's Epistemology of the Closet is often approached as one of the most groundbreaking discussions within the study of queer theory. Combining philosophical, legal, literary, and historical approaches towards queerness and human sexuality, Sedgwick's text is focused on the destruction of the dichotomous divides used to discuss and categorize expressions and epistemologies (states of … Continue reading Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s [Epistemology of the Closet] – A Staple of Queer Theory

Daniel Keyes’ [Flowers for Algernon] – On Disability, Animality, and Structure

I think I'll begin by stating that Flowers for Algernon is perhaps one of the most beautiful and heartbreaking books that I've read recently. In the narrative, Algernon is the name of a laboratory mouse who successfully underwent an operation to increase its intelligence. The main focus of the novel, however, is Charlie Gordon,  a man suffering … Continue reading Daniel Keyes’ [Flowers for Algernon] – On Disability, Animality, and Structure