CFP: Queer Futurities in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Hi readers! I'm organizing/chairing a session at the MLA conference in New York City in January 2018. This is a non-guaranteed session that is sponsored by the Children's and Young Adult Literature Forum. The call for papers is posted is below. Feel free to share this CFP widely to kidlit and queer studies scholars! ¡Gracias! … Continue reading CFP: Queer Futurities in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Course Syllabus: Young Adult Speculative Fiction

Hello readers! As promised, here is the syllabus for a seminar that I'm currently teaching at Bowdoin College. The seminar is entitled (Im)Possible Lives: Young Adult Speculative Fiction, and it is currently offered under Bowdoin's English Department and the Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies program. The course description is as follows: How do wizards, monsters, cyborgs, and … Continue reading Course Syllabus: Young Adult Speculative Fiction

The Intersection of Deaf and Gay Identity in Young Adult Literature

I'm thrilled to announce the publication in my essay "Without a word or sound": Enmeshing Deaf and Gay Identity in Young Adult Literature. This essay is found in an critical volume edited by Jacob Stratman entitled Lessons in Disability: Essays on Teaching with Young Adult Literature, published by McFarland Press (November 2015). Although not obvious … Continue reading The Intersection of Deaf and Gay Identity in Young Adult Literature

Developing a Course on Metafictional Young Adult Literature

During the past couple of weeks, I've been working on developing various literature courses, including a course on the metafictional turn in contemporary young adult literature. As of now, I have entitled the course Book-Ception: The Metafictional Turn in Young Adult Literature. For those of you who are confused about the title, -Ception is a … Continue reading Developing a Course on Metafictional Young Adult Literature

My article on The Perks of Being a Wallflower is now available online!

I'm pleased to announce that my article entitled "Writing through Growth, Growth through Writing: The Perks of Being a Wallflower and the Narrative of Development" can now be found in The ALAN Review's digital archives. Here is a brief abstract of the article, which won the Nilsen-Donelson award for best article published during the volume … Continue reading My article on The Perks of Being a Wallflower is now available online!

Trading Spaces: Gay Markers of Urbanity and NBC’s Will & Grace

In her discussion on “Queer in the Great City,” Julie Abraham exemplifies the ontological associations that exist between homosexuality and urbanity. Abraham argues that queer people are culturally approached as signifiers that represent the differences between urban and rural spaces, and more specifically, she claims that their very presence “marks a place as properly urban” … Continue reading Trading Spaces: Gay Markers of Urbanity and NBC’s Will & Grace

We Are the Stories We Tell: Patrick Ness’ [More Than This]

(Major spoilers ahead. You've been warned!) "People see stories everywhere," Regine says. "That's what my father used to say. We take random events and we put them together in a pattern so we can comfort ourselves with a story, no matter how much it obviously isn't true." She glances back at Seth. "We have to … Continue reading We Are the Stories We Tell: Patrick Ness’ [More Than This]

Unrealistic Expectations: (Meta)Narrative in Andrew Smith’s [Winger]

Warning: The following post contains major spoilers for Andrew Smith's Winger.  After reading Andrew Smith's Grasshopper Jungle, I immediately knew that I had to read other works written by this author--and Winger seemed like the obvious choice. I finished reading Winger a couple of weeks ago. Typically, I write analyses and reviews of books soon after I read them, but for this novel, … Continue reading Unrealistic Expectations: (Meta)Narrative in Andrew Smith’s [Winger]

Escaping the Labyrinth: Suffering in YA Fiction and the Case of John Green’s [Looking for Alaska]

  How will we ever get out of this labyrinth of suffering? --A.Y. - John Green, Looking for Alaska (p. 158) What is the role of suffering in young adult literature? I've been obsessed with answering this question since one of my dissertation committee members asked me it a couple of weeks ago. My desire to answer this … Continue reading Escaping the Labyrinth: Suffering in YA Fiction and the Case of John Green’s [Looking for Alaska]