Land Ho! Navigating the Geospatial Imagination of 19th Century British and American Maritime Fiction

Since the end of October, seven of my colleagues (Douglas E. Duhaime, Ana M. Jimenez-Moreno, Melissa McCoul, Daniel Murphy, Santiago Quintero, Bryan Santin, Suen Wong) and I have been working on a massive project in which we are trying to "anchor" the geographical imagination of 19th Century British and American sea fiction (based on a … Continue reading Land Ho! Navigating the Geospatial Imagination of 19th Century British and American Maritime Fiction

Mapping the Imaginative Landscape of Texas After the Mexican-American War

Part of the consequences of the Mexican-American War was the appropriation of over 500,000 square miles of Mexican territory by the United States in 1848. Places such as Texas, California, New Mexico, and Arizona, which were originally considered part of Mexico, were now considered part of the United States--which posed an immense problem for Mexicans … Continue reading Mapping the Imaginative Landscape of Texas After the Mexican-American War

Protocol: How Control Exists After Decentralization

Alexander R. Galloway's Protocol: How Control Exists After Decentralization is by far one of the most exciting and challenging readings that I have encountered in a long time. In essence, it is a book on issues within the realm of computer science targeted towards individuals who have little or no experience within the field. By focusing his … Continue reading Protocol: How Control Exists After Decentralization