CFP: Queer Futurities in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Hi readers! I'm organizing/chairing a session at the MLA conference in New York City in January 2018. This is a non-guaranteed session that is sponsored by the Children's and Young Adult Literature Forum. The call for papers is posted is below. Feel free to share this CFP widely to kidlit and queer studies scholars! ¡Gracias! … Continue reading CFP: Queer Futurities in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Course Syllabus: Young Adult Speculative Fiction

Hello readers! As promised, here is the syllabus for a seminar that I'm currently teaching at Bowdoin College. The seminar is entitled (Im)Possible Lives: Young Adult Speculative Fiction, and it is currently offered under Bowdoin's English Department and the Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies program. The course description is as follows: How do wizards, monsters, cyborgs, and … Continue reading Course Syllabus: Young Adult Speculative Fiction

The Intersection of Deaf and Gay Identity in Young Adult Literature

I'm thrilled to announce the publication in my essay "Without a word or sound": Enmeshing Deaf and Gay Identity in Young Adult Literature. This essay is found in an critical volume edited by Jacob Stratman entitled Lessons in Disability: Essays on Teaching with Young Adult Literature, published by McFarland Press (November 2015). Although not obvious … Continue reading The Intersection of Deaf and Gay Identity in Young Adult Literature

Structure and Development in Mark Haddon’s [The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time]

The publication history of Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the God in the Night-Time (2003) is indeed very curious, mostly because it was deliberately marketed as both a children's book and an adult novel. This leads me to invoke a pressing issue among scholars and readers who are concerned with narratives of youth: is it possible, nowadays, … Continue reading Structure and Development in Mark Haddon’s [The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time]

John Corey Whaley’s “Where Things Come Back” – A Haunting and Truly Thought-Provoking Read

It is difficult to find quality young adult novels with a sensitive male teenager as the protagonist. While this has to do with the stereotypes generally tied to readers of the genre, the rarity of this character also has a lot to do with issues and perceptions of gender in contemporary society. There is something … Continue reading John Corey Whaley’s “Where Things Come Back” – A Haunting and Truly Thought-Provoking Read

On the Evolution of Literary Culture – Jim Collins’ “Bring on the Books for Everybody”

One of the greatest challenges throughout my years engaged in graduate study has been the struggle to validate my field. Validation certainly is a problem in the humanities, especially with the advent and reign of STEM fields and areas. However, even within the field of English, I am constantly met with ridicule, or sometimes scorn, … Continue reading On the Evolution of Literary Culture – Jim Collins’ “Bring on the Books for Everybody”

My Ultimate Reading Challenge – The Reading List for My PhD Candidacy Examinations

Part of the requirements for the doctoral degree in English at the University of Notre Dame are written and oral exams (which I will take in March of 2014). The exams are a requirement that demonstrate that all doctoral students have in-depth knowledge of a major field, a secondary field, and a literary theory/methodology, in … Continue reading My Ultimate Reading Challenge – The Reading List for My PhD Candidacy Examinations

Beyond “Words, Words, Words”: Soliloquies, the Graphic Novel, and the Great Shakespearean Divide

The following post is an excerpt from an article I am working on originally written for my class on Shakespeare: Editing and Performance, offered by Peter Holland at the University of Notre Dame (Spring 2012). This paper was presented at the 2013 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference in Washington, D.C., on March 20th, 2013. FAIR … Continue reading Beyond “Words, Words, Words”: Soliloquies, the Graphic Novel, and the Great Shakespearean Divide

Heternormative Tragedies? The Queerness of Eugene O’Neill’s “Bound East for Cardiff” and Henrik Ibsen’s “Rosmersholm”

Both Eugene O’Neill’s Bound East for Cardiff (1914)[1] and Henrik Ibsen’s Rosemersholm (1886) can be considered tragic, not only because they display characters that are unable to fit within the context of their social norms, but also because both plays portray the mortal downfall of its main characters. Nonetheless, the complexities of these “failures” increase … Continue reading Heternormative Tragedies? The Queerness of Eugene O’Neill’s “Bound East for Cardiff” and Henrik Ibsen’s “Rosmersholm”

A Note on the “Death of the Author”: A Discussion of the Viral Letter from a Dad to his Gay Son

Yesterday, a letter from a father to his gay son went viral on the internet. The image above was posted on the Facebook page of FCKH8, and as of now, this post has garnered over 80,000 likes. Here's a transcript of the letter if you're unable to read it in the image above: Nate, I … Continue reading A Note on the “Death of the Author”: A Discussion of the Viral Letter from a Dad to his Gay Son