On Feelings, the Body, and Queer Grief: Sara Ahmed’s “The Cultural Politics of Emotion”

I will begin by stating that Sara Ahmed's The Cultural Politics of Emotion is a book that I was really looking forward to, mostly because it uses a multidisciplinary approach to comprehend how emotions are tied to notions such as culture and power. Even more so, the book explores how emotions, despite their apparent abstractness, are physically … Continue reading On Feelings, the Body, and Queer Grief: Sara Ahmed’s “The Cultural Politics of Emotion”

Harry Potter and the Pink Umbrella: A Gendered Analysis of Hagrid

Little can be said of the Harry Potter franchise that hasn't already been said. Not only has Harry Potter become one of the most lucrative book series in history, but it has also won countless awards and cemented J.K. Rowling's position as a tour de force of children's literature. It has been adapted into a series of eight films that … Continue reading Harry Potter and the Pink Umbrella: A Gendered Analysis of Hagrid

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s [Epistemology of the Closet] – A Staple of Queer Theory

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's Epistemology of the Closet is often approached as one of the most groundbreaking discussions within the study of queer theory. Combining philosophical, legal, literary, and historical approaches towards queerness and human sexuality, Sedgwick's text is focused on the destruction of the dichotomous divides used to discuss and categorize expressions and epistemologies (states of … Continue reading Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s [Epistemology of the Closet] – A Staple of Queer Theory

Justin Torres’ “We the Animals”: A Fresh and Animalistic Twist to the Coming-of-Age Narrative

When constructing the list for my doctoral exams, I wanted to include novels that discussed issues of development, coming-of-age, and sexuality from multiple perspectives. Justin Torres’ We the Animals not only caught my attention because it was favorably reviewed by authors such as Michael Cunningham, but also because it contains Puerto Rican representations—and as some … Continue reading Justin Torres’ “We the Animals”: A Fresh and Animalistic Twist to the Coming-of-Age Narrative

John Donovan’s [I’ll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip] – The First YA Novel With Gay Content

During the same political and cultural climate that produced the 1969 Stonewall Riots, John Donovan's I'll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip was published.  Although the riots were not causal of the books publication, it is no coincidence that both events were symptomatic of the tensions and pressures faced by the newly forming gay … Continue reading John Donovan’s [I’ll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip] – The First YA Novel With Gay Content

My Ultimate Reading Challenge – The Reading List for My PhD Candidacy Examinations

Part of the requirements for the doctoral degree in English at the University of Notre Dame are written and oral exams (which I will take in March of 2014). The exams are a requirement that demonstrate that all doctoral students have in-depth knowledge of a major field, a secondary field, and a literary theory/methodology, in … Continue reading My Ultimate Reading Challenge – The Reading List for My PhD Candidacy Examinations

Gay Assimilationists versus Radical Queers: The Death of Queerness?

Last week, while leading a discussion on queer theory, the issue of gay assimilation and radical queerness came up. In a nutshell, gay assimilationists seek complete integration within existing cultural norms and institutions, while radical queers reject integration because they view it as an embrace of the very values and institutions that have fostered sexual … Continue reading Gay Assimilationists versus Radical Queers: The Death of Queerness?

Heternormative Tragedies? The Queerness of Eugene O’Neill’s “Bound East for Cardiff” and Henrik Ibsen’s “Rosmersholm”

Both Eugene O’Neill’s Bound East for Cardiff (1914)[1] and Henrik Ibsen’s Rosemersholm (1886) can be considered tragic, not only because they display characters that are unable to fit within the context of their social norms, but also because both plays portray the mortal downfall of its main characters. Nonetheless, the complexities of these “failures” increase … Continue reading Heternormative Tragedies? The Queerness of Eugene O’Neill’s “Bound East for Cardiff” and Henrik Ibsen’s “Rosmersholm”

A Note on the “Death of the Author”: A Discussion of the Viral Letter from a Dad to his Gay Son

Yesterday, a letter from a father to his gay son went viral on the internet. The image above was posted on the Facebook page of FCKH8, and as of now, this post has garnered over 80,000 likes. Here's a transcript of the letter if you're unable to read it in the image above: Nate, I … Continue reading A Note on the “Death of the Author”: A Discussion of the Viral Letter from a Dad to his Gay Son