Structure and Development in Mark Haddon’s [The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time]

The publication history of Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the God in the Night-Time (2003) is indeed very curious, mostly because it was deliberately marketed as both a children's book and an adult novel. This leads me to invoke a pressing issue among scholars and readers who are concerned with narratives of youth: is it possible, nowadays, … Continue reading Structure and Development in Mark Haddon’s [The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time]

Queer Times: An Analysis of David Levithan’s [Two Boys Kissing]

In the notes and acknowledgments section written at the end of Two Boys Kissing, author David Levithan states that "This isn't a book I could have written ten years ago" (199). Levithan is absolutely right. Back in 2003, when I was still a sophomore in high school, I could never fathom the possibility of finding a … Continue reading Queer Times: An Analysis of David Levithan’s [Two Boys Kissing]

Harry Potter and the Pink Umbrella: A Gendered Analysis of Hagrid

Little can be said of the Harry Potter franchise that hasn't already been said. Not only has Harry Potter become one of the most lucrative book series in history, but it has also won countless awards and cemented J.K. Rowling's position as a tour de force of children's literature. It has been adapted into a series of eight films that … Continue reading Harry Potter and the Pink Umbrella: A Gendered Analysis of Hagrid

John Donovan’s [I’ll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip] – The First YA Novel With Gay Content

During the same political and cultural climate that produced the 1969 Stonewall Riots, John Donovan's I'll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip was published.  Although the riots were not causal of the books publication, it is no coincidence that both events were symptomatic of the tensions and pressures faced by the newly forming gay … Continue reading John Donovan’s [I’ll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip] – The First YA Novel With Gay Content

Listening to the “Unheard Lyric”: Amplifying Faint Discourses in Oscar Wilde’s Fairy Tales

It’s interesting how easy it is for me to forget songs and stories that I heard last year, yet at the same time, it’s so easy for me to recall songs and stories that I heard as a child. Ask me something about the plot of Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, and I might need a few … Continue reading Listening to the “Unheard Lyric”: Amplifying Faint Discourses in Oscar Wilde’s Fairy Tales