J.D. Salinger’s [The Catcher in the Rye]: A Brief Analysis

Experience is the greatest enemy of meaning and significance. When I first read J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye during my late teens, I was absolutely captivated by the novel's passive anti-hero, Holden Caulfield. I felt his loneliness, his distaste towards all of the "phoniness" present in the world, and his constant state of utter helplessness … Continue reading J.D. Salinger’s [The Catcher in the Rye]: A Brief Analysis

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On Feelings, the Body, and Queer Grief: Sara Ahmed’s “The Cultural Politics of Emotion”

I will begin by stating that Sara Ahmed's The Cultural Politics of Emotion is a book that I was really looking forward to, mostly because it uses a multidisciplinary approach to comprehend how emotions are tied to notions such as culture and power. Even more so, the book explores how emotions, despite their apparent abstractness, are physically … Continue reading On Feelings, the Body, and Queer Grief: Sara Ahmed’s “The Cultural Politics of Emotion”

Brotherhood, Race, and Gender in Martin Wilson’s “What They Always Tell Us”

Young adult novels, generally speaking, tend to be emotionally draining reads. It is not uncommon for teens and young adults to feel angst, loneliness, and depression when trying to transcend into the realm of adulthood (as many of us know when we look back at our teen years, or as we currently experience them). I … Continue reading Brotherhood, Race, and Gender in Martin Wilson’s “What They Always Tell Us”

Harry Potter and the Pink Umbrella: A Gendered Analysis of Hagrid

Little can be said of the Harry Potter franchise that hasn't already been said. Not only has Harry Potter become one of the most lucrative book series in history, but it has also won countless awards and cemented J.K. Rowling's position as a tour de force of children's literature. It has been adapted into a series of eight films that … Continue reading Harry Potter and the Pink Umbrella: A Gendered Analysis of Hagrid